• Keyboard Layouts

    2017-08-28 00:01:01 -0200

    Keyboard Layouts for Windows and macOS

    Often we need to type symbols that do not exist in the standard keyboard layouts. One way to solve this issue is to assign specific symbols in several applications, such as Microsoft Word or LibreOffice Writer but with most applications this is not even an option. The best way to address this issue is by installing a specified keyboard layout. I created three keyboard layouts: one for writing Cypriot Greek and includes the characters that are needed to produce the post-alveolars, a layout for accessing IPA symbols, and a layout for adding symbols when working with historical manuscripts (paleography).

  • IPAGreek Application

    2017-08-27 10:08:38 +0200

    IPA4

  • LT2202, Statistical methods

    2017-07-01 12:08:38 +0000

    Course Plan

     

    Class Topics Materials Code
    Class 1
  • Phonetics

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Speech Pathology

  • Phonetics

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Writing and speech

  • Segments

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    screenshot

  • Introduction to R

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Charalambos Themistocleous

  • Introduction to Python

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Charalambos Themistocleous

  • Prosody

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    screenshot Goal: Determine the effects of Information Structure on Prosody cross-varietaly.

  • Phonology

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Prosodic Phonology

    Current phonological models aim to determine the structure of the linguistic representation of speech melody. These models capture aspects of speech melody related to linguistic prominence (a.k.a., tonicity), phrasing (a.k.a., tonality), and tune (questions, statements, commands etc.). The sociolinguistic and interactional aspects that speech melody conveys are considered non-linguistic which is another way to say that they are outside the scope of phonological analysis. Even though this distinction has served the purposes of phonological theory, it does not capture all information encoded in speech signals during communication. In several works, my aim is to determine the linguistic and non-linguistic factors that influence prosodic production and its manifestation in speech signals.

  • Phonetics

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    \textbf\textscVowels and Consonants** The past sixty years have seen increasingly rapid advances in the field of phonetics and speech acoustics, which established the acoustic properties of vowels and consonants. Many studies within this research paradigm were guided primarily by the urge to identify the invariant features of speech that realize speech sounds. The invariant features were considered as the ``actual’’ properties of vowels and consonants whereas the non-invariant features were thought to be insignificant. For instance, vowels were identified by the first two—and in some cases three—formant frequencies, which were measured once in the middle of each formant frequency. Along with this line of research, however, there has been an increasing interest over the effects of factors, such as speaker physiology, sociolinguistic properties, emotional state etc. on the acoustic structure of vowels and consonants. Following this line of research, in a number of studies, I attempt to determine how vowel and consonant spectra convey both linguistic and non-linguistic information. To understand these patterns, I employ methods from signal processing and machine learning. Especially, I am extremely interested in machine learning methods, such as deep Neural Networks, SVMs, HMMs, which are behind current impressive achievements in text-to-speech, speech perception, machine translation, image description generation, and semantic interpretation. I believe that these methods can offer insights into human perception and cognition including the processing and accessing information.

  • Phonetics

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Language acquisition and diglossia

  • Deep Learning

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    screenshot

  • The Phonology of Prosody

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

    A puzzling issue of linguistic theory is how humans map speech, which is characterized by notable diversity, into abstract linguistic categories. I explore the extent to which both phonological and phonetic models and machine learning methods, such as deep neural architectures, can offer insights into the cognitive foundations of speech that make this mapping possible.  In the following, I organize my research into four projects.

    The Phonology of Prosody

    Prosody refers to the melodic patterns of speech. The melodic units of speech are characterized by continuous dynamic properties. A long-standing problem in phonology of prosody is to provide a formal definition of the units, a.k.a., pitch accents that make up the melodic pattern of speech, a.k.a., intonation. A relevant problem in phonological theory is how pitch accents are timed with respect to vowels and consonants. Several hypotheses were proposed that aim to define the timing of pitch accents with the segmental structure. By exploring the timing of the Cypriot Greek L*+H prenuclear pitch accent, in Themistocleous (2016), I investigated the predictions of three hypotheses: the invariance hypothesis, the segmental anchoring hypothesis, and the segmental anchorage hypothesis using two experiments: the first of which manipulates the syllable patterns of the stressed syllable, and the second modifies the distance of the L*+H from the following pitch accent. In the study, I show that the findings on the alignment of the low tone (L) corroborate the predictions of the segmental anchoring hypothesis: the L persistently aligns inside the onset consonant, a few milliseconds before the stressed vowel. However, the findings about the alignment of the high tone (H) are both intriguing and unexpected: the alignment of the H depends on the number of unstressed syllables that follow the prenuclear pitch accent. The ‘wandering’ of the H over multiple syllables is extremely rare among languages, and casts doubt on the invariance hypothesis and the segmental anchoring hypothesis, as well as indicating the need for a modified version of the segmental anchorage hypothesis. To address the alignment of the H, we suggest that it aligns within a segmental anchorage–the area that follows the prenuclear pitch accent–in such a way as to protect the paradigmatic contrast between the L*+H prenuclear pitch accent and the L+H* nuclear pitch accent.

    Another relevant issue of the phonology of intonation is the formal description of pitch accents that make up the phonemic inventory of a language or dialect. Themistocleous (2011b) provides the first description of Cypriot Greek pitch accents and compares their production with those of Standard Modern Greek. Specifically, Themistocleous (2011) provides a model of prenuclear and nuclear pitch accent accents of Cypriot Greek. He also shows that there is significant dialectal variation in the realization of pitch accents with respect to their alignment and pitch range. Overall, Themistocleous (2011) provided a model about the way pitch accents manifest categories of information structure, namely information focus, topic, contrastive focus, and contrastive topics (see also Themistocleous, 2012).

    Prosodic structure refers to the phonological constituents of prosodic hierarchy, such as the syllable, the foot, the phonological words and intermediate and intonational phrase. These phonological constituents account for various phenomena that take place at their edges, one of these phenomena is final lengthening. In Themistocleous (2014), I conducted two experiments that investigate the interaction of edge-tones and final lengthening. The study shows that in Cypriot Greek the following occur: (a) lengthening applies primarily on the syllable nucleus not the syllable onset, which suggests variety specific effects of lengthening; (b) lengthening depends on the edge-tones, namely, polar questions trigger more lengthening than statements and wh-questions; (c) lengthening provides support for at least two distinct prosodic domains over the phonological word, the intonational phrase and the intermediate phrase; greater lengthening associates with the first and shorter lengthening with the latter; (d) finally, syllable duration depends on the syllable distance from the boundary, i.e., lengthening locally applies on penultimate and ultimate syllables whereas antepenultimates are affected the least. Additionally, by pointing to the distinct lengthening effects of edge-tones and domain-boundaries, the findings provide evidence for dinstinct lengthening devices.

  • History of Neural Networks

    2017-05-31 14:08:38 +0200

  • Modern Greek vowels and the nature of acoustic gradience

    2017-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    vowels

    • date = “2017-07-01”
    • publication = “Phonetica, 74, 157 – 172.”
    • title = “Modern Greek vowels and the nature of acoustic gradience.”
    • url = “https://doi.org/10.1159/000450554”
  • Acquiring Clitic Placement in Bilectal Settings: Interactions between Social Factors

    2017-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = K. Grohmann, E. Papadopoulou, C. Themistocleous
    • date = “2017-04-12”
    • publication = “Frontiers in Communication”
    • title = “Acquiring Clitic Placement in Bilectal Settings: Interactions between Social Factors”
    • url pdf = “https://doi.org/10.3389/fcomm.2017.00005”
    • url = “https://doi.org/10.3389/fcomm.2017.00005”
  • Dialect classification using vowel acoustic parameters

    2017-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    vowels

  • A sociophonetic study of Standard Modern Greek and Cypriot Greek Stop Consonants.

    2017-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = E. Anastasi, A. Logotheti, S. Panayiotou, M. Serafim, Marilena, and C. Themistocleous
    • date = 2017-01-01
    • publication = Paper to presented at the 12th International Conference on Greek Linguistics (ICGL12), 16 – 19 September 2015. Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.
    • title = A sociophonetic study of Standard Modern Greek and Cypriot Greek Stop Consonants.
  • Sextus Empiricus Adversus Grammaticos and the debate Ideal Language vs. Language Variation

    2016-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    authors = Ch. Themistocleous date = “2016” publication = “Stasinos 7, 145–152.” title = “Sextus Empiricus Adversus Grammaticos and the debate Ideal Language vs. Language Variation”

  • The bursts of stops can convey dialectal information.

    2016-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    bursts

    • authors = Ch. Themistocleous
    • date = “2016-01-01”
    • publication = “Journal of the Acoustical Society of America EL 140(4).”
    • title = “The bursts of stops can convey dialectal information.”
    • url_pdf = “http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4964818”
  • Effects of stress on fricatives: Evidence from Standard Modern Greek

    2016-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = C. Themistocleous, A. Savva, A. Aristodemou
    • date = “2013-07-01”
    • publication = “Interspeech 2016”
    • title = “Effects of stress on fricatives: Evidence from Standard Modern Greek”
    • url pdf = “http://dx.doi.org/10.21437/Interspeech.2016-1057”
  • Research Design and Statistics in Linguistics

    2015-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    anchorage

    • authors = Ch. Themistocleous
    • date = “2013-07-01”
    • publication = “Athens: Ion. ISBN: 978-960-508-187- 4.”
    • title = “Research Design and Statistics in Linguistics. Using R (In Greek: Πειραματική μεθοδολογία και στατιστική στη μελέτη της γλώσσας με τη χρήση της R).”
    • url = “http://www.iwn.gr/product.asp?catid=17589”
  • Seeking an anchorage

    2015-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    anchorage

  • The Utilitarian dictionary of Modern Greek

    2014-12-31 14:08:38 +0200

    Project Description

  • Addressing writing system issues in dialectal lexicography

    2014-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = S. Armosti, K. Christodoulou, M.Katsoyannou, and C. Themistocleous”]
    • date = “2014”
    • publication = “Granadillo, Tania (Eds). Dialogue on Dialect Standardization (pp. 23 – 38). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.”
    • title = “Addressing writing system issues in dialectal lexicography: the case of Cypriot Greek.”
    • url = “http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167639316303132”
  • Modern Greek Prosody

    2014-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = Themistocleous, Charalambos
    • date = “2014”
    • publication = “Stasinos 6. 319-344.”
    • title = “Modern Greek Prosody. Using speech melody in communication (Prosodia tis Neas Ellinikis. I axiopoiisi tis melodias tis fonis stin epikoinonia). “
  • Edge-Tone Effects and Prosodic Domain Effects on Final Lengthening

    2014-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = Ch. Themistocleous
    • date = “2013-07-01”
    • publication = “Linguistic Variation 14(1). 129– 160.”
    • title = “Edge-Tone Effects and Prosodic Domain Effects on Final Lengthening.”
    • url = “http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167639316303132”
  • The Present Perfect in Cypriot Greek revisited

    2013-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = Melissaropoulou, Dimitra, Themistocleous, Charalambos, Tsiplakou, Stavroula, & Tsolakidis, Symeon (2013).
    • date = “2013”
    • publication = “In Peter Auer, J. C. Reina & G. Kaufmann (Eds.), Language Variation – European Perspectives IV: Selected papers from the Sixth International Conference on Language Variation in Europe (ICLaVE 6), Freiburg, June 2011 (pp. 159 – 172). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.”
    • title = “The Present Perfect in Cypriot Greek revisited.”
  • Textual Structure and Modality in Thucydides’ Military Exhortations

    2013-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = A. Tsakmakis, C. Themistocleous
    • date = “2013”
    • publication = “In A. Tsakmakis and M. Tamiolaki (Eds). Thucydides Between History and Literature (pp. 391 – 408). Berlin, Walter de Gruyter.”
    • title = “Textual Structure and Modality in Thucydides’ Military Exhortations.”
    • url = “https://www.degruyter.com/view/books/9783110297751/9783110297751.391/9783110297751.391.xml”
  • Current Trends in Greek Linguistics.

    2012-01-01 16:16:01 -0600

    Book Cover

  • Meaning and Form in the Tonal Representation

    2012-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = C. Themistocleous
    • date = “2012”
    • publication = “In Fragaki, Georgia, Georgakopoulos, Athanasios, Themistocleous, Charalambos (Eds). Current Trends in Greek Linguistics (pp. 271 – 289). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.”
    • url = “http://www.cambridgescholars.com/current-trends-in-greek-linguistics-16”
  • Cypriot Greek Nuclear Pitch Accents

    2012-01-01 14:08:38 +0200

    • authors = Ch. Themistocleous
    • date = “2012”
    • publication = “ In Z. Gavriilidou, Efthymiou, E. Thomadaki & P. Kambakis-Vougiouklis (eds), 2012, Selected - papers of the 10th ICGL, pp. 796 – 805. Komotini/Greece: Democritus University of Thrace.”
    • title = “Ta pirinika tonika ipsi tis kypriakis ellinikis (Cypriot Greek Nuclear Pitch Accents).”
    • url = http://www.icgl.gr/files/greek/75-796-805.pdf